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Gad About Guide (London 1948)

Found - a city guide book from 1948 - the year of the London Olympics. The tone is upbeat. There is no mention of the war or austerity, there is even talk of one businessman commuting to work by helicopter. The guide was put out by a long defunct car hire company called Walter Scott, possibly named after the novelist…the guide book is a good snapshot of late 1940s London. The letters of appreciation from aristocrats and a 'world famous actress' are especially amusing.


GAD ABOUT GUIDE

Issued every now and then, to help
busy people get about London quickly.


THIRD EDITION


WALTER SCOTT

MOTOR COMPANY LTD.
Car Hirers Since 1903
SLOane
2131/2/3
214/8 Pavilion Road, Sloane Square, S.W.1.
MAIda Vale 0191
and 3431
109 Goldhurst Terrace, Hampstead, N.W.6.
PADdington 0164 5 and 6 Burwood Mews, Edgware Road, W.2.


GADDING THROUGH THE AGES

    Ever since Boadicea had an urgent appointment with a Roman general–not a rock's throw from the present Bank of England–the question of getting quickly about London has been uppermost in the minds of visitors (and Londoners alike) who value every minute of their time.
    Our brass-hatted British Queen, on her way to sack the Roman garrison, solved her problem with a two-wheeled chariot with hollow-ground hub blades. In Medieval times, the horse-drawn litter, a kind of four-poster bed on shafts, carried the nobleman swiftly over the cobbles to his appointments. More comfortable, perhaps, was its descendant, the 16th century coach, though not without drawbacks. For its occupant journeyed in constant fear of an enterprising type of rogue, a spring-heeled spiv whose speciality was to leap on to the back of the carriage, slash open the canopy and snatch his wig, which might easily have cost two hundred pounds.

    Later on, our 18th century gadster became chairborne. Reclining in his Sedan, a scented pomander ball held between his elegant nose and the strong odour of the populace, he was borne by trusty retainers about the Town. Even so, there were certain setbacks. Across the entrance of Landsdowne Passage, at the eastern end of Curzon Street, one may still see the iron posts placed there to stop the exploits of a dangerous highwayman who would often use this narrow alley as a quick getaway after robbing passers-by in Piccadilly.

    Enter the 19th century with a clatter of cab-wheels, a great company of carriages and coaches, of broughams and barouches, and a marked absence of careful driving in the streets of London. Here is Charles Dickens describing a typical scene :–
    "What's the matter here, can you tell me?" – "On'y a cab, sir." – "Anybody hurt, do you know?" – "On'y the fare, sir, I see him a-turnin' the corner, and I ses to another gen'lm'n that's a reg'lar little oss that, and he's a-coming along rayther sweet, an't he?" – "He just is, 'ses the other gen'lm'n, ven bump they comes agin a post, and out flies the fare like bricks."
    Need we say it was the red cab, or that the gentleman with the straw in his mouth, who emerged so coolly from the chemist's shop and philosophically climbing into the little dickey, started off at full gallop, was the red cab's licensed driver?
    Time marches on and the ways and means of getting about London have waxed and multiplied since Dickens' time. But they have brought new and more ingenious pitfalls of their own. Perhaps the saddest story we know concerns the old lady from the country, laden with parcels, attempting again and again to descend backwards from an Inner Circle train at a certain station, only to be assisted forwards by a helpful porter, assuming that she was trying to get in. And for all we know she may still be describing inner circles to this day.
    Naturally, many brave attempts have been made to control the restless surge of London's vast ever-moving population. As Belisha gave us the beacon, so the modern planner has given us the staggers, but neither with conspicuous success.
    And so, in his turn, the present-day visitor to London who really values his time, has looked round for a better solution to his coming and going with the maximum mobility and the minimum fuss. And in the hiring of a private car he has found the answer–a car, to all intents and purposes of his own, for just as long as he needs it, piloted by a knowledgeable chauffeur. That is the modern way–the Walter Scott way.
    What of the future? Already there is a London business man who parks his helicopter outside his office. Perhaps one day we shall be airborne too, and with the assistance of Walter Scott Helicopter Hire? But until then he is content to provide the most comfortable and efficient car hire service on terra firma–improving the shining hour by saving the valuable minutes of his many satisfied customers.


DINING OUT IN LONDON

  
Bagatelle
Hungaria
Dorchester
Lansdowne
Grosvenor House
Prunier
Scott's
Boulestin
Savoy

    These are names to conjure with, and everyone who elects to visit such universally known and appreciated restaurants knows what kind of service to expect. But there are other places, often equally famous and accomplished in the art of good living but varying in characteristics and tariffs.



AU PETIT CORDON BLEU
French cuisine. Morning coffee; luncheons; teas. No house charge. 11 Sloane Street, S.W.1. (Sloane 3716.)

AU JARDIN DES GOURMETS
Quiet, and the best Soho atmosphere. Ideal for a pleasant semi-business chat over lunch (7/6) or dinner (9/-). Famous for the excellence of its French cuisine and wines. 5 Greek Street. (Gerrard 1816.)

"Most of the good things of life are either illegal, immoral or fattening."–Daily Paper.

ALBERT
Presided over by M. Pessione, who served under Luigi at the Embassy. Therefore, excellent Continental cooking. Lunch 3/-; dinner 5/-. 53/55 Beak Street, W.1. (Gerrard 1296.)

LA COQUILLE
French cuisine, with fish and particularly shell fish as a speciality, served in an upper and lower restaurant of singular charm. Lunch 6/-; dinner 5/6. St. Martin's Lane, W.C.2. (Tem. 8768.)

GOW'S
Solidity here, both of surroundings and of food. Famous pre-war, for steaks and chops and bitter in silver tankards, served in Victorian boxes. 37 St. Martin's Lane, W.C.2. (Tem. 8357.)

IVY
Well-known theatrical people eat here in this plain but luxurious restaurant. Lunch 7/6; dinner 9/-. 1 West Street, W.C.2. (Tem. 4751.)

YOUNG'S CHINESE
Good Chinese food, which is of particular attraction these meat-short days. Fully licensed. 178/180 Wardour Street (Oxford Street end). (Gerrard 4089.)

VEGA
Vegetarian food of high quality and imaginative preparation. Distinguished by the frequent patronage of a Very Important Person. 56 Whitcombe Street, Leicester Square, W.1. Lunch 11.30 a.m.-2.30 p.m. Tea 3.15 p.m.-5.30 p.m. Mon. to Sat. (Whitehall 9612.)

ECU DE FRANCE
First class French restaurant of style and charm. Lunch 7/6; dinner 9/-. 111 Jermyn Street, W.1. (Whitehall 2837.)



OYSTER BARS
BENTLEY'S
11 Swallow Street, W.1. (Regent 0431.)
CUNNINGHAM'S
51 Curzon Street, W.1. (Grosvenor 3141.)
DE HEM'S
11 Macclesfield Street, W.1. (Gerrard 2494.)
DRIVER'S
46 Glasshouse Street, W.1. (Regent 4646.)
WHEELER'S
19 Old Compton Street, W.1. (Gerrard 2706.)
WILTON'S
34 King Street, S.W.1. (Whitehall 8391.)

CITY RESTAURANTS
HOOP AND GRAPES
Aldgate, E.C.3. An old inn, owned by the noted Trust Houses.
OLD BELL
Holborn. Singular because it is a peninsular of the City licensing area (10.30 p.m. closing) in the midst of Gamages building, which is in Holborn (11.0 p.m. closing). See page 21.

HISTORIC INNS
GEORGE INN
77 Borough High Street, S.E.1.
PROSPECT OF WHITBY
Wapping Wall, E.1.
YE OLDE CHESHIRE CHEESE
Fleet Street, E.C.4.
RAILWAY TAVERN
(Charlie Brown's) West India Dock Road, E.14.
YE GRAPES
16 Shepherds Market, W.1.

THE WALTER SCOTT SERVICE

Behind what seems to be an effortless service, there lie many years of experience, extending back to 1903, when at Goldhurst Terrace, Hampstead, Walter Scott–with the aid of the new Renaults and Panhards, the best cars of the day–commenced the very earliest chauffeur-driven Car Hire Service.
    What was then a novelty is now part and parcel of the daily round. Whereas it was then an event, and at times an adventure, to be taken for a drive in one of these motor cars, to-day, by dialling a telephone number and waiting for just the time it takes for a modern car to travel from the nearest Walter Scott depot, you can be picked up anywhere by an immaculately turned-out car and whisked away to wherever you want to go. You can be called for at your home or hotel and taken to dinner, after which "your car," waiting outside, delivers you effortlessly at the theatre or wherever you have elected to relax. Later it meets you again to take you to supper and eventually, to round off your evening, returns you to the point from which you started. And not once during the evening have you had a moment's anxiety about getting from place to place. No question of whether you will be able to get a taxi or as to where you may park or not park your own car. And the freedom from transport worries which you can have for any one evening, can be yours by the day, the week or even longer.
    More and more business men are realising the value of being free from all the anxiety about getting from place to place when out and about in Town. They find Walter Scott Car Hire economical too, from the point of view of time saved, and much to be preferred to the worry and expenses of using one's own car in Town.
    As soon as you have ordered your car from Walter Scott it is, to all intents and purposes your own car. It may be a Rolls-Royce de Luxe without Hackney Carriage plates or any other nameplate or identification mark, or one of the modern Armstrong-Siddeley 7-seater Limousines, or medium size saloon cars that make up the Walter Scott fleet.
    It will be in beautiful condition, driven by a chauffeur who is carefully selected and trained.
    You can identify the car that meets you at the station by a discreetly displayed card bearing the name "Walter Scott", that is put away immediately you arrive. Thence forward the car is virtually your own to take you where you will at any time on business or pleasure.

FOR FULL TARIFF SEE
OUTSIDE BACK COVER



YE
GADSTERS
MAPPE
of
LONDON

PLACES OF
BUSINESS
&
PLEASURE

Be it understood that the itinerant gadster, be he endowed with compass, gun, camera, and the most astute sense of direction, will be hard pressed to reach his destination by the use of this map alone. Rather let him look upon it as a map designed for amusement–and amazement–only, though none the less exact in all its quarters. He will be well advised to entrust the more serious purpose of his travelling from place to place, to the able and willing services of Walter Scott.

USEFUL INFORMATION

MAIN LINE RAILWAY STATION

Southern Region
Cannon Street - WAT 5100
Charing Cross - WAT 5100
Holborn - WAT 5100
London Bridge - WAT 5100
Victoria - WAT 5100
Waterloo - WAT 5100

Midland Region
Euston - EUS 1234
Kings Cross - TER 4200
St. Pancras - TER 3600

Western Region
Paddington - PAD 7000

Eastern & North Eastern
Fenchurch Street - ROY 3605
Liverpool Street - BIS 7600
Marylebone - PAD 3400

AIRWAYS

Aer Lingus: 19 Regent Street, S.W.1. Sloane 0701.)
Air France: 2 Eccleston Street, S.W.1. (Whitehall 0838.)
Airways Terminal (for all lines): Buckingham Palace Road, S.W.1. (Victoria 2323.)
A.O.A.: 180 Regent Street, W.1. (Regent 8414.)
B.E.A. Terminal: Kensington High Street. (Weston 7227.)
B.O.A.C.: 75 Regent Street, W.1. (Regent 8444.)
K.L.M.: 202/4 Sloane Street, S.W.1. (Sloane 0331.)
S.A.B.E.N.A. 205 Regent Street, W.1. (Regent 4333.)

POSTAL INFORMATION

    It is of interest to note that there are two post offices (one in the City and one in the West End) which are open all night for "all classes of postal and telegraph business." They are :–

 
London Chief Office,
King Edward Buildings,
King Edward Street,
(Nr. St. Paul's Underground
Station) E.C.1.
MONarch 9876
 

 
Leicester Square Branch Office,
39 Charing Cross Road,
(Opp. Leicester Square Tube
Station W.C.2.
GERrard 2929

LOST PROPERTY

    This is one telephone number that you will not find in any directory or guide–the Lost Property Office. They get so many enquiries that they have to insist on a personal visit. So, if you lose your memory, your sense of humour or merely your gloves, in London, here are the addresses :–

Lost Property Office, 109 Lambeth Road, S.E.1.
(for property lost in taxis)
London Transport, 200 Baker Street.
(just beyond Baker Street Station)
There are also Lost Property Offices at all the Main Line Stations.

MISCELLANEOUS

Boots Chemists,
219 Piccadilly
(Piccadilly Circus).
Open both Day and Night.
(WHItehall 4761)
Heppels Chemists,
35 Haymarket.
S.W.1.
Open both Day and Night
(WHItehall 1363)


THEATRES

 
Adelphi - Tem 7611
Aldwych - Tem 6404
Ambassadors - Tem 1171
Apollo - Ger 2663
Casino - Ger 6877
Coliseum - Tem 3161
Comedy - Whi 2578
Criterion - Whi 3216
Duchess - Tem 8243
Duke of York's - Tem 5122
Garrick - Tem 4601
Globe - Ger 1592
Haymarket - Whi 9832
Hippodrome - Ger 3272
His Majesty's - Whi 6606
New - Tem 3878
Palace - Ger 6834
Palladium - Ger 7373
Phoenix - Tem 8611
Piccadilly - Ger 4506
Playhouse - Whi 4788
Prince of Wales - Whi 8681
Prince's - Tem 6596
St. James's - Whi 3903
St. Martin's - Tem 1443
Saville - Tem 4011
Savoy - Tem 8888
Stoll - Hol 3703
Strand - Tem 2660
Theatre Royal - Tem 8108
Drury Lane - Tem 8108
Whitehall - Whi 6692
Windmill - Ger 7413
Winter Garden - Hol 8881
Wyndham's - Tem 3028
 

CINEMAS

 
Academy - Ger 2981
Astoria - Ger 5528
Carlton - Whi 3711
Curzon - Gro 3737
Dominion - Mus 2176
Empire - Ger 1234
Gaumont - Whi 6655
Leicester Square - Whi 5252
London Pavilion - Ger 2982
Marble Arch Pav. - May 5113
Metropole - Vic 4673
New Gallery - Reg. 2255
Odeon, Leicester Square - Whi 6111
Odeon, Marble Arch - Pad 8011
Plaza - Whi 8944
Rialto - Ger 3488
Ritz - Ger 1234
Tivoli - Tem 5625
Warner - Ger 3423
 

NEWS CINEMAS

 
Cameo (Polytechnic) - Oxford Circus
Cameo - Piccadilly Circus
Cameo - Leicester Square
Cameo - Victoria
Eros - Piccadilly Circus
Monseigneur - Trafalgar Square
Monseigneur - Leicester Square
Monseigneur - Piccadilly Circus
Monseigneur - Strand
Studio Two - Oxford Circus
Tatler - Tottenham Court Road
Time News - Baker Street Station
Victoria - Victoria Station
Waterloo Station - Waterloo Station
World's News - Edgware Road
 

CONCERT HALLS

 
Aeolian Hall, Bond Street
Cowdray Hall, Bond Street
Kingsway Hall, Kingsway
Queen Mary Hall, Tottenham Court Road
Wigmore Hall, Wigmore Street
Royal Albert Hall, South Kensington
Alexandra Palace, Wood Green
Caxton Hall, Tothill Street S.W.1
Conway Hall, Red Lion Square, W.C.1.
Rudolf Steiner Hall, Baker Street
 

WEST END RESTAURANTS

 
Bagatelle - Gro 1128
Berkeley - Reg 8282
Boulestin - Tem 7061
Cafe Royal - Reg 8240
Carlton - Whi 7300
Claridges - May 8860
Dorchester - May 8888
Grosvenor House - Gro 6363
Ivy - Tem 4751
Lansdowne - May 1657
Le Coq d'Or - May 7807
Mayfair - May 7777
Mirabelle - Gro 1940
Monseigneur - Reg 6957
Piccadilly - Reg 8000
Prunier - Reg 1373
Quaglino's - Whi 6767
Savoy - Tem 4343
Scott's - Ger 7175
Trocadero - Ger 6920
Waldorf - Tem 2400
 


GREYHOUND RACING

 
Sat.
p.m.
Wed.
p.m.
Catford7.157.15
Charlton2.307.0
Clapton7.07.30
Hackney Wick2.307.30
Harringay7.307.30
Hendon7.307.30
New Cross7.157.30
Park Royal2.306.30
Stamford Bridge2.157.30
Walthamstow7.307.30
Wandsworth7.307.30
Wembley7.307.30
West Ham7.307.30
White City7.307.30
Wimbledon7.307.30

HORSE RACING

 
Alexandra Park
Ascot
Brighton
Epsom
Goodwood
Hurst Park
Kempton Park
Lewes
Lingfield
Newmarket
Plumpton
Windsor
 
and, of course, for CAR HIRE ring SLOANE 2131
or MAida Vale
0191 or Paddington 0164.
WALTER SCOTT MOTOR CO., LTD.



How to get in to places



THEATRE
TICKET
AGENCIES

Adams, H. J., 139 New Bond Street, W.1. (Mayfair 4775.)

Chappell & Co., Ltd., 56 New Bond Street, W.1. (Mayfair 7600.)

Hays, Alfred, Ltd., 74 Cornhill, E.C.3. (Avenue 3060.)

Keith Prowse & Co., Ltd., 45 Aldwych, W.C.2. (Temple 2828.)

Cecil Roy, Ltd., 74 Old Brompton Road, S.W.7. (Kensington 0121.)

Theatre Tickets & Messengers, Ltd., 100 St. Martin's Lane, W.C.2. (Temple 1023.)

GETTING INTO

THEATRES AND CONCERTS

    The great thing to remember when trying to get into a show (especially a popular show) is not to be floored! London is a big place and if the sources you tap first have run dry of tickets, then try further out—one of the suburban branches of the big agencies may not have sold all their stock and be able to give you what you want. Also don't overlook the possibilities of booking at the theatre itself. Many theatres sell a certain number of seats first thing in the morning (first come, first served, about 9 a.m.) for the performance the same evening.

GETTING INTO

B.B.C. SHOWS

    "Itma" is usually broadcast from the Paris Cinema in Lower Regent Street. This luxurious little cinema, with its red plush armchairs, is used exclusively by the B.B.C. for broadcasts of shows with audiences, and " Much Binding in the Marsh " is also broadcast from there. Both it and "Itma" sometimes emanate from the Aeolian Hall in New Bond Street, also a B.B.C. studio. The great People's Palace, Mile End Road is also the scene of big broadcasts, particularly "Variety Band Box." "Tuesday Pop," the orchestral programme, comes from the Maida Vale studios, and sometimes from the Concert Hall, Broadcasting House. Television shows are very occasionally broadcast with an audience from the hilltop Alexandra Palace in North London. Tickets for all these shows are obtainable by writing to the B.B.C., Broadcasting House, Portland Place, W.1.

GETTING INTO

LONDON'S HIGHEST LIFT

    It is 200 ft. high (accompanied by a staircase of 375 steps, if you prefer that!). At the top, looking from the 284 ft. tower you can see (through a safety grille) thirty miles on a clear day—from the Surrey Hill south of London to Harrow in the north. The lift is in the tower of Westminster Cathedral (nr. Victoria Station) and is open from 9 a.m. till dusk, according to the time of the year.

GETTING ON TO

LONDON'S RIVER

    Not only can you view central London's great buildings from the Thames, together with the Pool of London with its ocean shipping, but you can also travel upstream to Kew, Richmond, Hampton Court, etc., from Westminster Pier (Whitehall 2074) and downstream to Ramsgate, Margate, and other seaside towns, from Tower Pier, by Eagle Steamers (Royal 3200).

GETTING SOME RECREATION IN LONDON

BILLIARDS


    If you want to play billiards in London, your best plan is to find a friend who is a member of a good club—for instance, the Albany is reputed to have a very good billiard table. Some clubs, such as the Army & Navy, the United Services, have a working arrangement with provincial clubs, for the interchange of members. You can watch very fine billiards at the Leicester Hall (the old Thurstons) in Leicester Square, or at Burrows and Watts in Soho Square.

GOLF (INDOORS)


    This may be had, per hour, booked in advance, with the attendance of a pro, at Harrods, Simpsons, Selfridges, Lillywhite's, and Gamages.

RIDING


    Hacks may be obtained from :——
        Cadogan Riding School, 91 Cadogan Lane, S.W.1. (Sloane 8201.)
        Knightsbridge Riding School, 34 Queens Gate Mews, S.W.1. (Western 8474.)

TURKISH BATHS


    Savoy Turkish Baths :——
        92 Jermyn Street, S.W.1. (Whitehall 9552.)
        12 York Street, S.W.1. (Whitehall 7125.)
        25 Northumberland Avenue, W.C.2. (Whitehall 8007.)
        Bishopsgate Churchyard, E.C.2. (London Wall 3373.)

LONDON'S CURIOUS LICENSING LAWS


To those who relish a late drink, it may be of use to understand the following phenomena. If you are having a drink with some friends in, say, Kensington, your evening will be terminated at 10 p.m., the local closing time; but if you take a bus to Knightsbridge, you will find that they are open there till 11 p.m. If, after dinner, in Soho you are having a drink, say, in Charlotte Street, and are overtaken by the area's 10.30 p.pm. closing time, a brief walk to the south side of Oxford Street will bring you within an 11 p.m. area. Likewise, you can go from, say, the "Rising Sun" or the "Black Horse" in Tottenham Court Road (10.30 p.m. closing) to the "Camden" or the "Gower" in Store Street (closing 11 p.m.). Or, if in Swiss Cottage (10.30 p.m.), you can go down to St. John's Wood (11 p.m.). Thus do Father Time and the Licensing Justices add variety to London life!

COMING EVENTS IN LONDON

AUGUST
5-7Evening News Garden Lovers' Show–Olympia.
11-21International Congress of Mental Health–London.
12Athletics–British Empire v. U.S.A.–White City.
14Canoeing–Putney.
14Olympic Games Closing Ceremony–Wembley.
14-19Cricket–5th Test Match–Oval.
16-20International Horse Show–White City.
26Engineering Exhibition–Olympia.
SEPTEMBER
4-29Photography Exhibition–195 Piccadilly, W.1.
4Royal Canoe Club Regatta–Teddington.
26Brass Band Contests–Harringay.
28Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra–Albert Hall.
OCTOBER
1-9Commercial Motor Show–Earl's Court.
4Old Custom–Opening of Pudding Season, The Cheshire Cheese, Fleet Street, London.
26-29Dairy Show–Olympia.
27 to
Nov. 6
International Motor Show–Earl's Court.
NOVEMBER
2-3Horticultural Show–London.
6Art Exhibition–195 Piccadilly, W.1.
7Commemoration Service–Cenotaph.
9Lord Mayor's Show.
9-18Housing Exhibition–Olympia.
19Art Exhibition–Portrait Painters–195 Piccadilly, W.1.
DECEMBER
1Football–England v. Switzerland.
20Bertram Mills Circus–Olympia.
31Chelsea Arts Ball–Royal Albert Hall.

SOME BOUQUETS FROM SATISFIED CUSTOMERS

    "I should like to send a personal line of commendation of the driver who met me last night. My plane was switched with hardly any notice from Heath Row to land at Croydon. All the people at Heath Row could tell him was that the plane was not coming in there, but that it might, and probably would, come to Croydon, as if I landed there I should be stranded. He made an excellent cross-country journey and saved me any amount of time and trouble."

a former Cabinet Minister.

    "The Dowager Viscountess . . . would like to state to the Walter Scott Motor Co. that she was exceedingly satisfied with the entire expedition. She found Henry a most capable driver, and exceedingly willing and helpful in every way. She hopes he may be free to drive her in London later on."

    "We are very much obliged for the courtesy and prompt service given us on this occasion."

a City business house.

    "I would like to add my complete satisfaction for this service, and for the civility and courtesy of the chauffeur."

an Eminent Soldier.

    "I should like to say how much I appreciated the courtesy and kindness of all your drivers on the occasion of my daughter's wedding. They were helpful in every way."

a World-famous Actress.

    "I would like to thank you very much for the splendid service you gave me and for the courteous way all the orders are carried out. I always find your drivers so extremely civil and helpful and am most grateful for your co-operation at all times."

a South Coast Resident.

    "I meant to write directly after my late trip to East Kent to say how much I appreciated, not only John's driving, but also his general helpfulness and pleasant manner. He never puts a foot wrong."

a noted City Business House.

    "Lord C ––– and I would like to say how much we appreciate the punctual and very good Car Service you have supplied and would be grateful if Messrs. Walter Scott could know we had such nice and helpful chauffeurs, who have made all the difference to our comfort."

    "I should like to take this opportunity of expressing our appreciation both for the cars and drivers placed at our disposal. The drivers were particularly good in that no demand put upon them was too much trouble, and we shall have no hesitation in recommending your Company to our friends on future occasions."

A Midland Industrial Federation.


'CAR HIRE TARIFF'

Chauffeur Driven Day and Night Service

ROLLS ROYCE LIMOUSINES

First two hours, £2 2s., allowing 20 miles. 15s. an hour or 1s. 6d. a mile thereafter.
Day (8 a.m.-6 p.m.), £6 6s., allowing 60 miles.
To and from West End theatres, £2 2s., allowing 20 miles (additional journey to a restaurant, 15s.).
Weddings, £2 10s. for two hours and 15s. an hour after.
    Minimum charge £2 2s.
    Our fleet of modern Rolls Royce cars is probably without equal in London. These cars carry no "Hackney Plate," and are indistinguishable from the finest privately-owned vehicles.

ARMSTRONG - SIDDELEY 7-SEATER LIMOUSINES

1s. 6. mile for first 20 miles. 1s. 3d. a mile after or 12s. 6. an hour.
Day (8 a.m. - 6 p.m.), £4 14s. 6d., allowing 60 miles (excess time or mileage, if any, at above rates).
To and from West End theatres, £1 10s., allowing 20 miles additional journey to a restaurant, 12s. 6d.).
Minimum charge 12s. 6d.

MEDIUM SIZE SALOONS

1s. 3d. a mile first 12 miles. 1s. a mile or 10s an hour thereafter.
Day (8 a.m. - 6 p.m.), £3 13s. 6d., allowing 60 miles (excess time or mileage, if any, at above rates).
To and from West End theatres, £1 allowing 16 miles (additional journey to a restaurant, 10s.).
Minimum charge 7s. 6d.

With the compliments of

WALTER SCOTT

MOTOR COMPANY LTD.

Phone:
 
Sloane 2131
Maida Vale 0191
Paddington 0164
 





























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